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Wilco

Being There

Released 12/01/17 Label Rhino Genre Rock-Pop Cat no. CD 563215

Includes original album with 15 bonus tracks released for the first time, including alternate versions of tracks “I Got You” and “Say You Miss Me.” It also features Wilco’s 20-song performance at the Troubadour from November 12, 1996, combining songs from A.M. (“I Must Be High” and a full-throttle punk version of “Passenger Side,”) Being There (“Kingpin” and “Forget The Flowers”) and a few Uncle Tupelo tracks (“The Long Cut” and “Gun.”) Also included are four songs the band played on radio station KCRW on November 13, 1996.

$39.99

Released 12/01/17 Label Rhino Genre Rock-Pop Cat no. A 563215

Includes original album with 15 bonus tracks released for the first time, including alternate versions of tracks “I Got You” and “Say You Miss Me.” Also included are four songs played on radio station KCRW on November 13, 1996.

$84.99

Wilco have not made your standard rock & roll road album.

Tweedy's songs use the one-nighter clichés of Grand Funk Railroad's "We're an American Band" as a means of exploring deeper issues, particularly faith and commitment and how those qualities are tested by geographical and emotional distances. Being There is an album of parallel journeys that frequently overlap, a tour of the heart that becomes a search for renewal.

These journeys do not follow straight lines. Being There swings from the cocky-guitar raucousness of "Outtasite (Outta Mind)" on the first disc to the fatalistic acoustic strumming of "Someone Else's Song" on the second CD. "Sunken Treasure" is a jazzy, Astral Weeks-style reverie that unravels into a dissonant eruption worthy of Sonic Youth. When Tweedy sings, "I am so outta tune with you," he could be describing any of the relationships depicted in his songs — with a lover, a friend, even the music. The ambiguity is an attraction in itself.

On Being There's penultimate track, "The Lonely 1," the perspective shifts from that of the self-absorbed rock singer in "Misunderstood" to that of a fan who lives vicariously through music. Fittingly, the album closes with "Dreamer in My Dreams," a ramshackle rave-up that sounds straight out of Rod Stewart's Gasoline Alley. In the song, Tweedy concedes that "All the good things/They gotta go," but the band holds tight to the tune, pulling it back together each time the arrangement nears collapse.